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The Best Vegan Protein Sources

Veganuary is well underway, and we are getting a lot of questions regarding the best vegan protein sources. Whilst there are many protein sources available, we often find ourselves sticking rigidly to the same 3-5 options. Opting for vegan varieties will be helping both the planet and likely your overall health, by increasing the amount of plant-based food within your diet, and varying your protein sources.

We have lots of vegan recipes on our blog, which feature lots of the best vegan protein sources that we are about to list for you! Simply click on any of the meals below to see our full vegan recipe!

Vegan Sweet Potato Curry https://ldnmuscle.com/vegan-sweet-potato-curry-recipe/

No Bake Vegan Energy Balls https://ldnmuscle.com/no-bake-vegan-energy-balls/

Vegan Chickpea Curry Recipe https://ldnmuscle.com/vegan-chickpea-curry-recipe/

Homemade Sweet Potato Nachos, Salsa and Guacamole https://ldnmuscle.com/sweet-potato-nachos/

 

The Best Vegan Protein Sources:

We like to look at the grams of protein per 100g of each food, as vegan and vegetarian food is incorrectly seen as very low protein. In addition to this we like to include complete proteins, which means the food contains all nine essential amino acids we need to rebuild and create bigger protein tissue in our bodies (which is of more importance to active people, and especially those who lift weights!), but cannot make within our bodies.

 

Soybeans; Tofu, Tempeh and Edamame

Protein per 100g: 12-20g

These products all come from soybeans, which are a complete protein source.

 

Peanuts

Protein per 100g: 25g

Alone peanuts are undeniably fantastic, but not a complete protein. However, when you combine them with rice in a stir fry, or spread a nut butter on your bread of choice, you have complete protein source!

 

Almonds

Protein per 100g: 21g

The same as above is also true of almonds; great as a snack, but require being combined with grain-based foods to become a complete source of protein.

 

Lentils

Protein per 100g: 9g

If you opt for the sprouted version of lentils, all 9 amino acids are available making it a complete protein source, which goes well in so many meals including curries and chilli.

 

Rolled or Porridge Oats

Protein per 100g: 10g

An absolute staple in most peoples’ diets, the versatile oat grain is considered a complete protein when combined with foods like spirulina, nut butters and chia seeds.

 

Chickpeas (including Humous)

Protein per 100g: 7g

This is not a complete protein, but almost by fate, when you pair humous with pitta bread, you have a complete protein combination!

 

Varieties of Beans

Protein per 100g: 8-10g

These are usually considered incomplete protein sources, but when paired with grains like corn, rice or wheat you will have a complete protein meal!

 

Ezikiel Bread

Protein per 100g: 12g

This type of bread is a complete protein, and great alternative to many other highly processed breads, or variants like rye bread (which we personally cannot stand!).

 

Mycoprotein (Quorn)

Protein per 100g: 14g

This is a complete protein, but be sure to check the product as some quorn products are not suitable for vegans due to added ingredients in the processing of this food.

 

Quinoa

Protein per 100g: 14g

Quinoa is a complete protein, goes very easily with most foods, and is so nutritious NASA have stated they want to grow it on long term space missions!

 

Amaranth

Protein per 100g: 9g

This is another complete protein, and great to use with or instead of quinoa.

 

Spirulina

Protein per 100g: 57g

This is a complete protein, and also very high in protein, vitamins and minerals, making it a great addition to any diet plan. Spirulina powder goes especially well in green smoothies!

 

Hemp Seed

Protein per 100g: 30g

These provide a similar amount of protein per 100g as meats, and hemp seeds are also a complete protein, so match up on quality too!

 

Chia Seeds

Protein per 100g: 17g

These make a great addition to smoothies, oats and such like, and are considered a complete protein source. In addition to this they are very nutrient-dense, and a great part of anybody’s diet.

 

Green Peas

Protein per 100g: 7g

This is not considered a complete protein source, as it lacks the essential amino acid methionine. However, this can be resolved by having peas alongside foods like quinoa, tofu and beans!

 

Seitan

Protein per 100g: 25g

Very high in protein, but not considered a complete protein. Seitan is made from wheat-gluten, so should be avoided by people needing to adhere to a gluten free diet.

 

Ultimately, if you are consuming a variety of vegan protein sources at each meal and throughout the day, you will like be ingesting enough of a ranging amino-acid profile to reduce the worry of creating a complete protein source at every meal.

We hope you found this article both interesting and informing, regardless of how you choose to eat. Remember, our Transformation Guides are effective for vegans too, with specific dietary advice and our support as standard!

 

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We at LDNM Muscle Ltd hope you enjoy the inspired and fun recipes featured on our website, https://https://ldnmuscle.com (the “Website”).  LDNM Muscle Ltd is not responsible for the outcome of any recipe you try from the Website or any website linked to from this site. Recipes may not achieve desired results due to variations in elements such as ingredients, cooking temperatures, typos, errors, omissions, or individual cooking ability. You should always use your best judgement when cooking with raw ingredients such as eggs, chicken, or seafood and seek expert advice before beginning if you are unsure.

You should always take care when using sharp knives or other cooking implements. To ensure the safety of yourself and others, be aware of heated cooking surfaces while cooking. Please review all ingredients prior to trying a recipe in order to be fully aware of the presence of substances which might cause an adverse reaction in some consumers. Recipes available on the Website may not have been formally tested by us or for us and we do not provide any assurances nor accept any responsibility or liability with regard to their originality, quality, nutritional value, or safety. Unless otherwise stated, the recipes featured on the Website are not endorsed by any other companies/organization or their affiliates.

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